Grants and Awards

The ANZSCDB has a strong program of support for local meetings and attendance for post-docs and students at the Annual Meeting. Please see the opportunities and application details below.

Award Winners

Rehan Villani –Toshiya Yamada Early Career Award – Khosrotehrani Lab - UQ:
When I attended Combio this year it had been some time since I had been to a meeting with such a broad topic coverage. I have to say that the experience was quite wonderful. The standard of talks were very high and the action packed program meant there was always something on that I really wanted to attend (occasionally more than one). The highlight of my week at Combio was the plenary presentation by Professor Shigeru Kondo, his seminar on Turing mechanism of skin pattern formation was informative and interested, pure biology. There were many great talks in the concurrent sessions also, such as the presentation by J.Lock on polarity and motion which I found fascinating. I also was very proud to have received the Toshiya Yamada ECR presentation award as I have seen it presented a number of times, and I feel privileged to be among the past winners. Overall, I attended talks from cancer signalling to epigenetic regulation of metabolism, all of which were excellent and overall I really enjoyed my week.

Mengjie Hu – Cell Biology Student Poster Prize - Jans/Bogoyevitch - UniMelb:
"I enjoyed this year’s Combio Brisbane Conference and was impressed by the record numbers of plenary and concurrent symposiums, multidisciplinary presentations, posters and colloquium sessions. One of the most memorable lectures to me is “Deciphering Developmental Dell Death Using Drosophila as a Model” by Professor Sharad Kumar (recipient of The President's Medal), one of the founders of the mammalian cell death system in Australia as well as a strong advocate for the area. I learnt that Prof. Kumar has always been a mobile researcher, traveling to different labs around the world, applying various techniques in mammalian cells and Drosophila model to study the molecular machinery that determines cell apoptosis (programmed self-destruction of cells) and survival. Almost 25 years ago, his research team discovered Nedd2 (Caspase-2) as one of the first mammalian caspase genes with an unexpected role of a tumour suppressor. From then, a number of Nedd genes (such as Nedd4, the founding member of the WW-HECT type of ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) family; and Nedd8, a ubiquitin-like protein) that are central to the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival have been discovered and characterized in tumor suppression by his laboratory. In the lecture, Prof. Kumar shared some of his most recent findings on a large part of the Drosophila cell death machinery and a number of proteins that regulate the function of Nedd4 ubiquitin ligases. Within an hour, he presented me a journey of a thousand miles in science. I was inspired by his passion, long-standing motivation and perseverance in research. His work is undoubtedly the culmination of many years of hard work and close collaborations with many other scientists around the world."

Daniel Tyler Pederick - David Walsh Student Prize – Thomas Lab - UoAdelaide:
Presenting my work at ComBio 2016 gave me a great opportunity to discuss new ideas with principal investigators and fellow students from both related and unrelated fields. My presentation described the cellular mechanism that underpins a unique form of X-linked epilepsy that only affects females and is caused by mutation of the homotypic adhesion molecule PCDH19. We showed using unique mouse models that PCDH19 WT and PCDH19 mutant cells display striking segregation in the developing cortex which leads to epileptiform brain activity. My favourite presentation was a plenary lecture by Prof Shigeru Kondo, who spoke about his work in deciphering the mechanism of pattern formation in the skin of zebrafish. Overall ComBio 2016 was a great experience where I was able to expand my networking skills and be exposed to many researchers from different areas of science, something I recommend for any student.  

Sabrina Oishi – Keith Dixon Poster Prize in Developmental Biology – Piper Lab - UQ:
To Come.....

Travel Award winners 

Veronica Mendoza-Reinoso – Beverdam lab - UNSW:
ComBio2016 has been my very first experience of a scientific meeting of this scale. Besides enjoying the great opportunity to present my work at the “Transcriptional Programs in Tissue Biology” session, I had the unique chance to receive feedback from experts in my field. My knowledge about state of the art technologies in different research areas has increased considerably and I am impressed about the work that other groups are doing in Australia applying these technologies. Moreover, I was very surprised and pleased to find very young researchers with such successful careers in science, which I find very inspiring and encouraging for my future professional development.

Isabel Hemming –Heng Lab - UWA:
The Brisbane ComBio 2016 conference was my first interstate conference as a Ph.D. student. I enjoyed the wonderful atmosphere that surrounded the four-day event on the south bank of the Brisbane River. The opening plenary lecture was an informative insight into the multitude of possible evolution pathways leading to protein diversification. The range of topics and techniques covered in both the plenary lectures and concurrent symposia was wonderful, and helped to broaden my thinking and possible approaches to my own research projects. I greatly enjoyed my time at ComBio 2016, hearing about the interesting research being conducted throughout Australian and the field of biology.

Mengjie Hu – Jans/Bogoyevitch – UniMelb:
"I enjoyed this year’s Combio Brisbane Conference and was impressed by the record numbers of plenary and concurrent symposiums, multidisciplinary presentations, posters and colloquium sessions. One of the most memorable lectures to me is “Deciphering Developmental Dell Death Using Drosophila as a Model” by Professor Sharad Kumar (recipient of The President's Medal) , one of the founders of the mammalian cell death system in Australia as well as a strong advocate for the area. I learnt that Prof. Kumar has always been a mobile researcher, traveling to different labs around the world, applying various techniques in mammalian cells and Drosophila model to study the molecular machinery that determines cell apoptosis (programmed self-destruction of cells) and survival. Almost 25 years ago, his research team discovered Nedd2 (Caspase-2) as one of the first mammalian caspase genes with an unexpected role of a tumour suppressor. From then, a number of Nedd genes (such as Nedd4, the founding member of the WW-HECT type of ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) family; and Nedd8, a ubiquitin-like protein) that are central to the regulation of apoptosis and cell survival have been discovered and characterized in tumor suppression by his laboratory. In the lecture, Prof. Kumar shared some of his most recent findings on a large part of the Drosophila cell death machinery and a number of proteins that regulate the function of Nedd4 ubiquitin ligases. Within an hour, he presented me a journey of a thousand miles in science. I was inspired by his passion, long-standing motivation and perseverance in research. His work is undoubtedly the culmination of many years of hard work and close collaborations with many other scientists around the world."

Reyhan Akhtar – Abud Lab - Monash:
Attending ComBio2016 has been my first inter-state conference experience as an international student studying in Melbourne. 5 days, 50 symposia. Contrary to my expectations ComBio2016 wasn’t as intense as I thought it would be, which was great. The conference had diverse themes so I got the opportunity to listen to talks from researchers working in the different fields ranging from (but not limited to) stem cells and regeneration to cancer genomics and plant development. Being a PhD student, this has been an excellent opportunity to network not just with these speakers but also fellow PhD students. I got the chance to interact and share my PhD experiences with other researchers during poster sessions. I also managed to enjoy the warmth of the Brisbane weather! All in all I would say ComBio2016 has been a wonderful experience for me and has definitely helped building my confidence and broadened my knowledge. I would like to thank ANZSCDB for giving me this opportunity in the form of a travel award to attend ComBio2016 in Brisbane.

Local Meetings

Up to $1000 (inclusive of GST) per annum is available to each Chapter to support a local ANZSCDB Cell & Developmental Biology Meeting. In addition, ANZSCDB supports special interest group meetings organised by our members. The focus of the conference should be of high interest to cell and developmental biologists.

Who is eligible?
Applications are open to organizers of these meetings as long as they are/become members of ANZSCDB. All supported meetings will have at least one Society member on the organizing committee.

How do I apply?
Applications consist of a letter detailing the meeting title, location, approximate date and some proposed speakers. Applicants should also indicate other likely sources of financial assistance that would ensure the success of the meeting. Include details about predicted number of registrants and names of members of the organising committee who are also ANZSCDB members. You are urged to consider a gender balance in forming the meeting committee and selecting invited speakers.
Applications can be forwarded at any time to the President and should be submitted well in advance of the proposed meeting.

What does your Society require of you?
ANZSCDB requires acknowledgement in all promotional material for the meeting and at the meeting (e.g. in flyer announcing meeting, brochure at meeting, slide at meeting, on website). Upon completion of the supported meeting, the applicant will submit a short report for publication in the Society's newsletter.

ANZSCDB - supporting local Cell & Developmental Biology

ComBio

ComBio Awards for best Poster and Oral Presentations

  • The Toshiya Yamada Early Career Award - value $500*
  • The Keith Dixon Prize in Developmental Biology - value $350
  • The David Walsh Student Prize - value $350
  • ANZSCDB Cell Biology Student Poster Prize – value $350

Eligibility
All Postdoc and Student members who submit abstracts as presenting author at COMBIO are eligible for these awards. All presenting authors are encouraged to indicate on their abstract submission form that they would be prepared to give an ORAL presentation, although this is not obligatory for award eligibility. For more information see here.

Judging
Recipients are selected during the course of the meeting by a judges consisting of senior Society members who attend each presentation and evaluate the quality of the presentation, the contribution from each presenter and their understanding of, and ability to answer questions about their topic.

The awards are announced and presented at the closing ceremony of the COMBIO meeting.

ComBio Student Travel Awards

ANZSCDB PhD Student International Travel Award

This award is made to a student in his or her last two years of their PhD for travel to an international meeting. Applications will be called for by announce email to members.

Previous winners of this award are:
2013 - Cesar Canales Martinez (UNSW)
2014 - Claire Homan (Uni of Adelaide) and Jordan Gary Follett (IMB, Uni of Qld)
2015 - Joan Rohl (QUT, Brisbane)
2015 - Shannon Nicholson (Uni of Adelaide)